SortSmart® American Medical School Admissions Research

US medical school admissions research, intrinsic motivation in admissions, intrinsic motivation in medical education, medical school admissions in the united states, admissions screening

4 Options to view the study results:

Option #1: Full Report (Time to read: 30 minutes)

Includes all data.

Click here to read the full report. (For best viewing experience, click the full screen icon to read the report in full screen mode.)

Option #2: Conference Presentation (Time to watch: 29 minutes)

Live-recorded conference presentation of the results including background, rationale, hypothesis, select results and analysis.

Click here to watch the presentation.

Option #3: Brief Analysis (Time to read: 11 minutes)

Short commentary on the results including background information, rationale, data validation, analysis, and future directions.

Click here to read the brief analysis.

Option #4: Study Highlights (Time to read: 1 min)

  • 95% of medical students and residents believe current admissions practices need an overhaul and 94% would support a new, improved and transparent admissions screening tool.
  • Majority (75%) of future doctors report they were primarily motivated to apply to medical school by status, financial gain, or familial tradition.
  • Only 25% of current student & residents are intrinsically motivated and are willing to pursue medicine without external rewards.
  • 30% of medical trainees come from households with an annual income of over $120,000/year at the time of medical school application.
  • 54% of overall medical students and residents identify themselves as Caucasian with 39% of those from families earning over $120,000/year, the highest proportion of all groups.
  • On the other hand, 61% of those identifying as visible minorities were from families earning less than $80,000/year.
  • Use of MCAT preparation and admissions consulting services is not correlated with wealth.
  • No notable differences were observed in the reported trends across various admissions tools used to select applicants.
  • No correlation was found between cultural background or socioeconomic status and intrinsic motivation to pursue medicine.
  • Selecting applicants based on intrinsic motivation reveals a new approach to admissions practices in an effort to reduce socioeconomic and racial bias, while selecting best-suited future medical doctors. Read more...

SortSmart® Canadian Medical School Admissions Research

Canadian Medical School Admissions Study, intrinsic motivation in medical education, intrinsic motivation in admissions, medical school admissions in Canada, admissions screening

4 Options to view the study results:

Option #1: Full Report (Time to read: 30 minutes)

Includes all data. 

 Click here to read the full report. (For best viewing experience, click the full screen icon to read the report in full screen mode.)

Option #2: Conference Presentation (Time to watch: 29 minutes)

Live-recorded conference presentation of the results including background, rationale, hypothesis, select results and analysis.

Click here to watch the presentation. 

Option #3: Brief Analysis (Time to read: 11 minutes)

Short commentary on the results including background information, rationale, data validation, analysis, and future directions.

Click here to read the brief analysis. 

Option #4: Study Highlights (Time to read: 1 min)

  • 90% of medical students and residents believe current admissions practices need an overhaul and 97% would support a new, improved and transparent admissions screening tool.
  • Majority (68%) of future doctors report they were primarily motivated to apply to medical school by status, financial gain, or familial tradition.
  • Only 32% of current student & residents are intrinsically motivated and are willing to pursue medicine without external rewards.
  • 37% of medical trainees come from households with an annual income of over $100,000/year at the time of medical school application.
  • 49% of overall medical students and residents identify themselves as Caucasian with 48% of those from families earning over $100,000/year, the highest proportion of all groups.
  • On the other hand, 46% of those identifying as visible minorities were from families earning less than $60,000/year.
  • Use of MCAT preparation and admissions consulting services is not correlated with wealth.
  • No notable differences were observed in the reported trends across any of the 17 medical schools across Canada.
  • No correlation was found between cultural background or socioeconomic status and intrinsic motivation to pursue medicine.
  • Selecting applicants based on intrinsic motivation reveals a new approach to admissions practices in an effort to reduce socioeconomic and racial bias, while selecting best-suited future medical doctors. Read more...

Top 5 Admissions Screening Practices to Avoid in Order to Select the best Applicants While Making the Admissions Process Democratic and Equitable

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Admissions assessment is usually associated with the process of examining or testing candidates before they are admitted to a course or program. There are entire fields of study which evaluate and analyze how students are tested and whether improvements can be made to fundamental aspect of formal instruction. However, the principles that underlie admissions assessment are as important when applied to the very process of selecting those to be admitted to the course, program, or school. Universally, for competitive programs there are many more applicants than places available. Furthermore, once selected most entrants graduate. As a result, competition for entry to these fields is high. This takes into account the already high initial barrier to application. A candidate contemplating an application to a competitive program often needs the appropriate undergraduate degree to be eligible or competitive. This prerequisite must be completed with a competitive Grade Point Average and usually includes some form of entrance exam (MCAT, LSAT, GMAT, GRE etc.). To be considered, or have a reasonable chance of acceptance the applicant also requires additional experience such as volunteering, shadowing, research, and favorable references from each. The stakes for the individual applicant and the institution are high. The selection process therefore must be fair, credible, valid, and publicly defensible.

>> Grab Our Free Ultimate Guide to Admissions Screening <<

Here we will discuss the current state of the FIVE common admissions assessment measures that science has proven to be ineffective: Read more...

The president of the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada (AFMC) agrees with SortSmart that current medical school admissions practices should include better ways to detect intrinsic motivation, reports CMAJ.

AFMC agrees with SortSmart to include intrinsic motivation as part of medical school admissions, SortSmart appears in CMAJ, AFMC, CMAJ, AFMC president, Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada, admissions assessment, admissions screening

In a recent blog post on the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ), president and CEO of the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada (AFMC), Dr. Geneviève Moineau, gave her thoughts on SortSmart’s new findings that show that the majority of medical students and residents recognize the need, and support the development of an improved, more transparent admissions screening tool. We would like to thank the CMAJ and Dr. Moineau for a thoughtful examination of our findings.

The leadership of the AFMC acknowledged that better tools to evaluate “the intrinsic motivation to provide care and to advance scientific discovery” are warranted. This is promising and demonstrates the continued dedication of the organization to advance scientifically sound and fair admissions practices in Canada. This reflects the opinion of 90% of medical school students and residents that overwhelming demanded improvements to admissions practices, 97% of whom indicated their willingness to support a new, improved, and transparent admissions screening tool. Read more...

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